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A checklist of beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera) from the Matobo World Heritage Site, deposited in the Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe

Latest version published by Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe on Oct 7, 2017 Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe

A checklist of Coleoptera species was collated and summarized from data collected from museum specimen records and literature found in the Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe with an objective of documenting the diversity of beetles found in the Matobo world Heritage site. The checklist includes 382 species including some accepted names and synonyms from 34 coleopteran families and 228 genera all of which were collected from 1911 to present date.

Data Records

The data in this checklist resource has been published as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), which is a standardized format for sharing biodiversity data as a set of one or more data tables. The core data table contains 382 records.

This IPT archives the data and thus serves as the data repository. The data and resource metadata are available for download in the downloads section. The versions table lists other versions of the resource that have been made publicly available and allows tracking changes made to the resource over time.

Downloads

Download the latest version of this resource data as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) or the resource metadata as EML or RTF:

Data as a DwC-A file download 382 records in English (15 KB) - Update frequency: as needed
Metadata as an EML file download in English (15 KB)
Metadata as an RTF file download in English (14 KB)

Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

How to cite

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Mafuwe K & Mgumba C (2017): A checklist of beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera) from the Matobo World Heritage Site, deposited in the Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe. v1.3. Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe. Dataset/Checklist. http://www.nhmbyo.co.zw/ipt/resource?r=coleopteraspeciesofthematobo_world_heritage_sitehousedinthenaturalhistorymuseumofzimbabwe&v=1.3

Rights

Researchers should respect the following rights statement:

The publisher and rights holder of this work is Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC-BY-NC) 4.0 License.

GBIF Registration

This resource has been registered with GBIF, and assigned the following GBIF UUID: 06e2dcba-9799-4a04-a234-fdd684b4700c.  Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe publishes this resource, and is itself registered in GBIF as a data publisher endorsed by Participant Node Managers Committee.

Keywords

Coleoptera; Matobo world heritage site; Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe

Contacts

Who created the resource:

Kudzai Mafuwe
Curator of Entomology
Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe Corner Leopold Takawira and Park Street P. O. Box 240 Bulawayo Bulawayo ZW +2639250045
Chiedza Mgumba
Research Assistant/ Volunteer
Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe Corner Leopold Takawira and Park Street P. O. Box 240 Bulawayo Bulawayo ZW +2639250045

Who can answer questions about the resource:

Kudzai Mafuwe
Curator of Entomology
Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe Corner Leopold Takawira and Park Street P. O. Box 240 Bulawayo Bulawayo ZW +2639250045

Who filled in the metadata:

Kudzai Mafuwe
Curator of Entomology
Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe Corner Leopold Takawira and Park Street P. O. Box 240 Bulawayo Bulawayo ZW 2639250045

Who else was associated with the resource:

Curator
Kudzai Mafuwe
Curator of Entomology
Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe Corner Leopold Takawira and Park Street P. O. Box 240 Bulawayo Bulawayo ZW +2639250045

Geographic Coverage

The Matobo Hills were designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2003 with the National Museums and Monuments as one of the custodians of this landscape. The Hills cover an area of about 3100 km², of which 424 km² is a National Park, the remainder being largely communal land and a small proportion of commercial farmland The world heritage site is known for its distinctive geological formations and landforms, and it is these products of geomorphological processes that have hosted flora, fauna and human communities for more than 500 000 years. The area has predominantly sandy soils although there are variations in clay content as well. The mean temperature is around 26.3°C in summer and 17°C in winter. Rainfall is mainly received between the months of October to April. Rainfall received in the area averages 601.7 mm per year. The Matobo World Heritage Site, lying in the Zambezian savannah biome, under a generally dry climate, has a high diversity of vegetation types within a comparatively small area, including miombo woodlands and afromontane vegetation. Woodland species of Albizia, Cassia, Combretum, Pterocarpus, Ziziphus and Kirkia, interlace with the exposed granite. In the open woodland/sandveld areas, various dominant species occur, including Burkea africana, Pterocarpus rotundifolia, Terminalia sericea, and the mopane trees in association with Terminalia randii, Euclea divinorum and Grewia bicolor, in . In these areas, grass cover is sparse; consisting of weak perennials and annuals of Aristida spp., Eragrostis spp. and Chloris spp. The kopje vegetation also supports a variety of lichens and the resurrection plant.

Bounding Coordinates South West [-20.784, 28.062], North East [-20.355, 28.88]

Taxonomic Coverage

All beetles collected and identified to genus, species or sub species level were used to develop this checklist

Order  Coleptera (Beetles)

Temporal Coverage

Formation Period 1911-current

Sampling Methods

Data on the beetles recorded from the Matobo world heritage site were collated from specimen records and literature in the Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe, George Arnold Collection deposited between 1911 and 2017. Additional records were also obtained from weekly surveys conducted between March 2015 and August 2016 to collect data from poorly-sampled and under-represented areas of the site, following the literature survey records that had been obtained. The data was collected using stratified random sampling at 5 sites, across the various habitats and sampling points in the world heritage site. Pitfalls, beating trays and sweep nets where used to collect the samples, which were then identified to the lowest possible taxonomic rank using the available keys and the reference collection in the Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe. The records where digitized into Microsoft Excel (2010) database and the records where cleaned using OPEN REFINE Data cleaning tool (Version 2.5). Taxonomic ranks, status and authorship were also verified using The Catalogue of Life List Matching Service (2017), Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) database, The Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) name parser (2011) and The Global Names Index database where possible.

Study Extent Data on the beetles recorded from the Matobo world heritage site was collated from specimen records, literature and field notes from the Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe, George Arnold Collection deposited between 1911 and 2017.
Quality Control While standardizing the records to DarwinCore standards, we carried out a major effort for checking errors and inconsistencies among the data using Excel and OPEN REFINE Data validation tools. We followed the guidelines proposed by Chapman 2005 and also checked for synonyms and taxonomical errors in the data set

Method step description:

  1. The creation of the checklist included the following processes: 1 A list of beetles recorded from the given study area was obtained from the museum specimen records and literature found in the Natural History Museum Of Zimbabwe Entomology Collection. 2 Digitization and documentation of the list was carried out into Microsft Excel (2010) database using Darwin Core Standards. 3. Data validation and cleaning was then carried out in OPEN REFINE (Version 2.5) as well as Microsoft Excel (2010) data validation tools. 4 The determination of taxonomic status and authorship and chekcing for taxonomic errors was carried out using The Catalogue of life List Matching Service, Encyclopead of Life (EOL) database, The Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) name parser and The Global Names index database where possible. 5. The dataset was then uploaed and published on the the GBIF databse using The Integrated Publishing Toolkit (version 1.2) for the Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe

Collection Data

Collection Name Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe, George Arnold Entomology Collection
Specimen preservation methods Pinned,  Mounted

Bibliographic Citations

  1. Chapman, A. D. 2005. Principles of Data Quality, version 1.0. Report for the Global Biodiversity Information Facility, Copenhagen. ISBN 87-92020-03-8. Available online at http://www.gbif.org/resource/80509.
  2. OpenRefine. A free, open source, power tool for working with messy data [Internet]. [cited 6 Jun 2017]. < http://www.openrefine.org>.
  3. GBIF (2011). GBIF Name Parser. Copenhagen: Global Biodiversity Information Facility. Accessed the [6 June 2017]. Available online at http://tools.gbif.org/nameparser/.
  4. Encyclopedia of Life. Available from http://www.eol.org. Accessed 6 June 2017.
  5. Catalouge of Life List Matching Serivce. Available from http://www.catalogueoflife.org/content/list-matching-service. Accessed 6 June 2017.
  6. The Global Names Index. Available from http://gni.globalnames.org/name_strings. Accessed 6 June 2017.

Additional Metadata

Purpose The main purpose of this checklist is to document the diversity of beetles found in the Matobo world Heritage site and to improve on the accessibility of data for research and conservation purposes in Zimbabwe. Museum records in general can be used in education sectors and help bring science to the wider public. Documentation of data generally unlocks mounds of information locked away in analogue form in museums. Moreover, as museums often store sizable numbers of specimens, they are quite useful for taxonomical verification and reuse of metadata for various purposes. The compiled list can therefore form a basis for the formulation of hypotheses testing in insect ecology and conservation of biodiversity in the Matobo World heritage site, such as investigating effects of climate change on biodiversity, as well as impacts of invasive species and other related human induced factors on biodiversity in the world heritage site. Policy makers can use the collated information for making policies that protect biodiversity and help ensure its appropriate and sustainable management of the country's Natural resources
Maintenance Description This dataset will be updated as needed, and as new records are acquired.
Alternative Identifiers 06e2dcba-9799-4a04-a234-fdd684b4700c
http://www.nhmbyo.co.zw/ipt/resource?r=matobo_beetles